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"Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo- Little Black Book Edition"
Reviewed by: Mark Allred
Genre: Comedy
Video: Anamorphic Widescreen 1.85:1
Audio: Dolby Digital 5.1
Languages English and French
Subtitles English and French
Length 88 minutes
Rating R
Release Date March 14, 2006
Studio Buena Vista
Commentary: None
Documentaries: None
Featurettes: "Making the Deuce"; Director's Video Diary; "Fly on the Set"; and Seven Deleted Scenes.
Filmography/Biography: None
Interviews: None
Trailers/TV Spots: None
Alternate/Deleted Scenes: Seven Deleted Scenes
Music Video: None
Other: None
Cast and Crew:

Rob Schneider, Arija Bareikis, Eddie Griffin, William Forsythe, Oded Fehr, Gail O'Grady

Written By: Harris Goldberg and Rob Schneider
Produced By: Sid Ganis
Directed By: Mike Mitchell
Music: Teddy Castellucci
The Review:

After the subsequent sequel that was hailed as one of the worst movies of 2005 by the nations top critics, the filmmakers must have decided to throw the attention off of the sequel and back onto the original. With that idea, the studio has released "The Little Black Book Edition" which is not really that different from the original DVD release, but it has a few extras thrown in the mix.***

The movie itself has not changed, it still follows Deuce (Schneider) as he tries to make money from male prostitution to fix an ill-tempered gigolo's (Fehr) expensive fish tank. Deuce comes complete with a pimp, TJ (Griffin), and soon he's on his way from making ten dollars to a hundred. The inevitable catch is that he must date and please the most revolting of women. He dates many women with odd behaviors or physical features (most notably a grossly obese woman and a woman with Tourrette's syndrome), and is able to please them without having sex with them. This is the part of the movie that makes up for the rest of the disgusting parts, because it shows that Schneider at least had some sort of moral or a heart when writing the script (unlike the sequel). He meets Kate (Arija Bareikis) and forms a romance, which seems to be doomed from the start. The movie has its moments, but it is not a spectacular comedy.***

Image and Sound:

Both the video and the audio have not changed since the original DVD release of "Deuce" and, subsequently, there really isn't much to say about how impressive either of them are. The video is Anamorphic Widescreen, and the Audio is Dolby Digital 5.1 (basically the standard).***

The Extras:

The only difference between this version and the old version is the extras. The studio has included an eight minute featurette, "Making the Deuce" (which can't be much different than "The Making of Deuce Bigalow" on the original). They have also included a three minute long "Director's Video Diary" featuring the diary of director Mike Mitchell. Next comes seven deleted scenes, which are not all that impressive compared to the scenes included in the film, and after that comes a behind the scenes look at the filming process called "Fly on the Set."***

Commentary: None***
Final Words:

Deuce Bigalow isn't really that great of a comedy to warrant this type of DVD release. It did make quite a bit at the box office, but my guess is that this DVD won't be that successful. The added extras are the only difference between the old and the new, and my guess is that the old version should suffice.***

 

 
 
 
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